Do you have a sweet tooth? A new study suggests it may be killing you!

A new study released suggests that your sweet tooth may be killing you. A study of more than 40,000 people published in JAMA Internal Medicine shows that those with the highest sugar intake had a four times increase in their risk of heart attacks compared to those with the lowest intakes. This study showed that your risk of heart attacks doubles if sugar makes up 20 percent of your calories. Just one 20-ounce soda daily increases your risk of a heart attack by about 30 percent.

For years, we’ve been taught that sugar is harmless except as a source of empty calories. They are not empty calories. As it turns out, sugar calories are deadly calories. Sugar causes heart attacks, obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, cancer and dementia. Unlike the natural sugars existing in fruits and some vegetables, added sugars are introduced to foods during their processing and preparation. Sugar-sweetened beverages like soda are the leading source of added sugar consumption in the U.S., followed by grain-based desserts, like cookies and cake.

High levels of sugar consumption lead to elevated insulin levels, insulin resistance, high triglycerides, lower HDL (good) cholesterol and dangerous small LDL (bad) cholesterol. It also triggers the inflammation we now know is at the root of heart disease. Lowering overall sugar intake is a great natural way to lower your inflammation levels. Remember, simple carbohydrates such as flour, most breads, pastas, and white rice are quickly turned into sugar by our bodies and are just as dangerous as eating regular sugar.

It is time to cut down on your sugar and simple carbohydrate consumption to improve your health. A healthy diet includes lean protein, healthy fats, and complex carbohydrates – carbohydrates with a large amount of fiber, which slows the release of sugar into the intestine. (See previous articles)  This diet or lifestyle is the best way to eat to keep your insulin levels low, to lose weight, and to help prevent heart disease.

Author: drjeffgreenberg

Dr Greenberg is a clinical cardiologist who specializes in preventive cardiology, nutrition, exercise, and longevity. He favors using natural methods to improving one's health.

2 thoughts on “Do you have a sweet tooth? A new study suggests it may be killing you!”

  1. Should I increase my fiber intake to assist my diet and exercise routine? Due to my age (bladder) my water intake is low and not as much as recommend for weight loss. I was hoping more protein would help me drop more weight. I have stopped sodas of all types and Significantly reduced my carb intake. Looking for some ideas. I also have peanut allergies so I do not eat many nut products. Thanks

    1. Phil,
      Increasing your fiber intake is very important for good health and weight loss. Fiber not only helps to keep you regular, but it also helps decrease blood sugar levels, insulin levels, and cholesterol levels naturally. Fiber has no calories and helps to fill you up. A good goal for daily fiber intake is at least 30 grams. Remember though, increase your daily fiber intake slowly to avoid GI upset. Lean protein is also an important part to a healthy diet. Finally, seeds can be a good alternative to nuts.

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