How many carbs should I eat a day to lose weight?

Reducing the amount of carbohydrates in your diet is one of the best ways to lose weight. By reducing the carbohydrates in your diet, especially simple carbs, you will lower your insulin levels. Insulin is the storage (get fat) hormone. Lowering insulin levels keeps your body from storing excess sugar as fat. Furthermore, lowering your insulin levels allows fat to be released from your fat cells to be used as energy. Reduced-carb lifestyles also have benefits that go beyond just weight loss. They naturally lower blood sugar, blood pressure and triglycerides. They raise HDL (the good cholesterol) and improve the pattern of LDL (the bad cholesterol) from type B to type A.

There is no clear definition of exactly what constitutes a low or reduced carb lifestyle. Furthermore, what is low for one person may not be low for another. An individual’s optimal carb intake depends on multiple variables such as age, gender, body composition, activity levels, and current metabolic health. People who are physically active and have more muscle mass can tolerate a lot more carbs than people who are sedentary. Metabolic health is also a very important factor. When people become insulin resistant, obese, or type II diabetic, the rules change. People who fall into this category can’t tolerate the same amount of carbs as those who are healthy. They become “carbohydrate intolerant”. If you are overweight with belly fat, chances are you are carbohydrate intolerant.

For most people, I would recommend starting in the range of 50-100 grams of carbohydrates a day. This range is great if you want to lose weight effortlessly while allowing for a bit of carbs in the diet. It is also a great maintenance range for people who are carb sensitive. This level corresponds to eating lots of vegetables, 2-3 pieces of fruit per day, and minimal if any starchy carbohydrates.

For some though, the 50-100 gram range may not be enough to see benefit. Those who are significantly carbohydrate intolerant, pre-diabetic, insulin resistant, diabetic, or significantly obese may need a lower range to see benefit. If the 50-100 gram range is not working, try the 25-50 gram range. At this level, you can eat plenty of low-carb vegetables, some berries, and minimal carbs from other foods. This range can be difficult for some people to maintain.

Remember, everyone is different. You will need to experiment to see what level works best for you. You may need to start out at a fairly low level, but subsequently you may be able to increase your daily intake as you lose weight and become more carbohydrate sensitive. If you want to try out a reduced carb lifestyle, I recommend initially tracking your food intake for a few weeks to get a feel for the amount of carbs you are eating.

Very important: if you are a diabetic or on diabetes medication, you will need to discuss your diet changes with your primary care physician or endocrinologist first. This is critical. You will need to monitor your blood sugars closely, and most likely reduce your diabetes medication. Your blood sugars will drop fairly quickly and you do not want to become hypoglycemic. Do not try without your personal physician’s guidance.

If you are trying to become healthier and lose weight, give this dietary lifestyle a try. Most people’s metabolisms are just not able to handle the amount of carbohydrates they are ingesting on a daily basis. Lowering your daily carbohydrate intake will make you healthier, naturally, subsequently reducing the need for medications.

Are potatoes making you fat?

While eating a whole potato would seem on the surface to be a reasonably healthy choice compared with processed foods, spuds can be a dud when it comes to their effect on your blood glucose level. Many potatoes fall into the high range on the glycemic index, (GI) which measures the effects of foods on blood sugar. High GI foods, with a score higher than 70, cause your blood sugar to spike quickly. Medium-glycemic foods rank at 55 to 70 on the scale and have a modest effect on your blood sugar. Ideally, the majority of the foods you eat should be low on the glycemic index and have a value less than 55. These low-GI foods raise your blood sugar slightly over a longer period of time. Unfortunately, most potatoes rank higher than table sugar on the glycemic index.

Russet potatoes are some of the worst offenders when it comes to upping your blood sugar. Russets are the most commonly eaten potato in America. A baked russet has an average GI value of 85. If you eat the skin, it falls a bit lower, whereas peeling the skin away makes it as high as 111. Baked white potatoes have a glycemic index of 82. Instant mashed potatoes have a glycemic index of 87. Sweet potatoes have a glycemic index of 70. A better option is yams. Yams have an average GI of 54, meaning they’ll have less effect on blood sugar. Comparatively, table sugar has a glycemic index of 58. Remember, the higher the glycemic index or load, the higher and quicker your blood sugar raises. The higher and quicker your blood sugar rises, the more insulin your body releases to deal with the elevated blood sugar. Finally, high insulin levels lead to obesity.

Remember, potatoes are carbohydrates that are turned quickly into sugar by your digestive tract. This leads to elevated insulin levels and promotes obesity. If you do eat potatoes, also eat the skins, which lower the glycemic index of potatoes. Also remember, the longer potatoes are cooked, the higher the glycemic index. Cooking potatoes breaks down the carbohydrates, which makes the sugars more easily and quickly absorbed. Overall, avoid potatoes if you are trying to lose weight.